Monday, 2 March 2009

Prequel-Sequel

The forthcoming edition of The Tradition, due out in a few days time, publishes my rather long article on Jupiter-Saturn conjunctions. It focuses on the current economic crisis and so my following comments in advance of that form something of a prequel, but because today's news follows on from that article, they are also a sequel.

http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7918168.stm

Today's news brings further gloom as the stock markets worldwide plummeted again; a seven-year low for the Dow Jones and a six-year low for the FTSE 100, also announced was the $61 billion loss made by AIG in America, an all-time greatest loss. So, what can be seen astrologically to account for this?



This chart is set for the approximate time that the markets fell to their lowest point, it may be a few minutes out. Although still in aspect, Mars is separating from Jupiter and neither are in major aspect with Saturn. We do have Saturn retrograde in the 2nd house, but it feels as though it's been there for a very long time! If, however, we take note of the Moon - and we must because it's in the 10th - it is the strongest in this figure and separates from the Mercury-Mars conjunction by square, but it applies to void of course. So, we need to look elsewhere for our cause.




This is the chart for the last Jupiter-Saturn conjunction, the one that has been causing all the trouble. Notice that it occurs at 22° Taurus and that the Moon in the FTSE chart is applying to it closely as the markets hit the bottom. More telling is the FTSE Mars (i.e. transiting Mars) is applying to the square of the conjunction. Now we must wait until this Mars square has separated for matters to settle down again and that will be about the 20th March after it has moved into Pisces where it has some dignity. This is around the time of the Vernal Equinox, and as this square will have completed by then and Mars's opposition to Saturn has not yet begun, so this chart, at least, is a little improved.

So, hold on tightly and watch the news for the next two or three weeks.

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